Without Womxn The Sky Would Fall: PYO Statement on Domestic Violence Awareness Month

patriarchy

Without Womxn The Sky Would Fall!

Patriarchy manifests itself as the oldest universal oppression felt by women – reaching across class, racial and national lines through varying degrees. October is designated as “Domestic Violence Awareness Month” nationwide. Domestic violence affects women and children, as well as men. However, the brunt of domestic violence is felt by women at a much higher rate.1

Patriarchal violence is not something that can be reformed; it has a history reaching back thousands of years, and is now repackaged and reproduced by capitalist society on a psycho-ideological level as well as a physical one. Whether it is through emotional or physical abuse, the feminization/pinkification of certain industries, gender roles, sexual harassment, restrictions on women’s health or the gender wage gap, the intersections of institutional and societal sexism, racism, queerphobia, transphobia and xenophobia all serve to amplify, and often justify, the atrocities perpetuated by a patriarchal system. All these issues together play as an act of violence against women, and they are fundamental to maintaining the structures that support modern day late-capitalism. Continue reading

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Colum-Bust Day: Genocide Is No Reason To Celebrate!

columbusThe United States of America as it stands is and was founded as a white supremacist settler-colonial state that could not exist without the almost total genocide of the original inhabitants of this land and the enslavement of those with Black skin. To literally and figuratively whiten it’s image and history it has adopted legends surrounding itself which are no more than moral and ideological justifications for Empire. We see this with it’s narrative of Plymouth Rock and the Puritan zealots in their plight to escape oppression, to Thanksgiving where the indigenous people and colonizers sat down together to enjoy a shared meal, to Columbus Day where Christopher Colombus “discovered a continent”. Nothing is mentioned about the fact that he had died thinking this was Asia, and nothing about the fact that people had already been living here for thousands of years and that had cities more vastly populated than anywhere in Europe at the time. Far from being a day of celebration, Christopher Columbus represents one of the darkest chapters in the history of this continent, it represents a chapter full of genocidal murder, human trafficking and unimaginable brutality against the native people of this continent.

For oppressed people of color Columbus Day is a constant reminder that many of our ancestors and their suffering did not matter. In extension we do not matter as well. The schools, the media and the government utilize these days in such a manner to indoctrinate themselves and those they oppress to accept their lot. While lionizing the image of the colonizers and omitting and failing to mention the history of those who resisted the invasion of this world, we are taught to look up to people who look like them and to hate ourselves.

Even among supposedly progressive narratives we are given an image of indigenous people as cattle lining up for the slaughter or that they didn’t exist at all. The truth is that their descendants are still fighting and resisting this unwarranted aggression to this day. From Agüeybaná, to Oscar López Rivera, from Nat Turner to Malcolm X the oppressed have always resisted their oppressors. Continue reading