Dare To Struggle and We Won! UMKC Tuition Hike Defeated!

May DayThis past week the College of Arts & Sciences Student Council received a plan to increase the A&S Course Fee to $60 per credit hour. They are standing to make $3.1 million from this increase, but at what cost to the students? This change would have impacted more than 9,000 students who would have to pay anywhere from $500-$1000 more in fees each semester. This fee is also recurring from year to year. Each year the fee will increase due to another decision by UMKC administrators. They haven’t informed any of their students of this proposal either, not even so much as a courtesy email or letter in the mail. PYO-KC as an organization flyered and posted information surrounding the town hall and imploring students to be involved to oppose administration and the CSA student council’s proposal.

The financial strain that this proposal puts on students is immense. A large amount of students who go to UMKC already rely on scholarships with many having to take out thousands of dollars in loans on top of those inadequate scholarships. UMKC students are forced to work long hours at local businesses, rely on their family, and sacrifice study time to pay for rising tuition costs. Nevertheless, we have won a concrete victory last night in regards to the proposed tuition hike on behalf of working class and oppressed nationality students. Last night at the University of Missouri-Kansas-City town hall meeting about the recent proposal to increase tuition we mustered up our forces. What we found was the scheduled town hall was to be held in a pathetically small room in the Administration building that could have fit no more than 30 people, our organization composed more than half of those in attendance nevertheless. We voiced our opposition in many ways, which the administration and College of Arts and Sciences student council was ill-prepared for. Continue reading

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Break The Cages: End Detainment of Asylum Seekers!

Asylum-seekers fleeing violence in their home countries are being indefinitely held in private detention centers under horrendous conditions and set for deportation to countries where they face immediate danger. In light of this situation detainees in these facilities began a series of hunger strikes, demanding immediate release and an end to deportation. The hunger strikes originated mid- October at an El Paso detention center with 54 South Asian detainees and it quickly spread to several other detention centers in the South, including the LaSalle Detention Center in Louisiana, the T.Don Hutto Detention center, the East and West Facility of Adelanto in California and more, as the risk of death through starvation became their only route to freedom. These acts of solidarity show the level of desperation for humane treatment that is not provided by our government. The detainees made the following demands: Continue reading